Turn Your Child’s Artwork Into Colorful Text Prints (Part 2)

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Could you have guessed that all these prints were created in PowerPoint with the Dumpling’s scrap art? It’s actually quite easy—all you need to make custom text art are scanned copies of your child’s artwork and access to PowerPoint!

Text Art 2.jpg

(Before starting the tutorial below, please refer to Part 1 for tips on how to set up the PowerPoint slide to fit your paper that you would be printing on. I have since given up trying to narrate a tutorial because I’m just a terrible speaker!)

Step 1: Create and format your text in PowerPoint. 

In a blank PowerPoint slide, go to “Insert”, select “Text Box” and draw a text box on the slide. Then type in your custom text and format it to your preference, but do not change your text color—keep it black.

(The fonts I used in the demo are Ice Cream Sandwich and Watermelon Script, both of which are free for personal use on dafont.com.)

Step 2: Save the file as JPG or PNG.

Go to “File”, “Save As”, and then select either “PNG” or “JPG” from the file type drop down.  

Step 3: Delete the text box.

Click anywhere on the text box perimeter to select the box, then delete it—we don’t need it anymore!

Step 4: Insert your child’s artwork file.

Go to “Insert”, “Pictures”, and select the image file of your child’s artwork. Please note that it’s best to use a piece that’s abstract, bright and colorful, with lots of paint area coverage. Feel free to also resize the dimensions to fit your side if necessary.

Step 5: Insert the text art file.

Go to “Insert”, “Pictures”, and select the image file of your text that was created in Steps 1 and 2. This would temporarily cover your chid’s artwork, but don’t worry!

Step 6: Make the text transparent.

With the text art file selected, go to “Format”, click “Color”, and select “Set Transparent Color”. Then click anywhere on the text that is black. This function tells PowerPoint to transform anything that’s colored black into a transparent area. As a result, we see your child’s artwork layer that’s hidden underneath. Pretty cool right?

The “Set Transparent Color” function would work if you used black and white images as well—just insert them along with you text box in Step 1!

Here’s a demo with an image.

Update: More demo using black and white images!

Reindeer silhoutte used in the demo is downloaded from freeprettythingsforyou.com. The Esteh font is downloaded from dafont.com.
Unicorn silhouette used in the demo is downloaded from freeprettythingsforyou.com. The Esteh font is downloaded from dafont.com.
NYC skyline image downloaded from Freepik.

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